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Pre-injury crime, substance abuse, and neurobehavioral functioning after traumatic brain injury

Abstract:
There is limited information regarding the effects of preinjury history of arrest or history of substance use on neurobehavioral functioning after brain injury. The current study included 211 patients with traumatic brain injury, who were seen for a follow-up neuropsychological evaluation in an outpatient setting. An effort was made to distinguish between (1) patients with a history of preinjury arrests and patients without a preinjury history of arrests, (2) patients classified as substance abusers and non-abusers and (3) patients with and without a history of preinjury illicit drug use on the basis of demographic characteristics, injury characteristics, and neurobehavioral functioning. Results indicate significant differences between patients with a history of preinjury arrests and patients without a preinjury history of arrests in terms of demographic and injury characteristics. Differences were also noted between persons classified as substance abusers and non-abusers in terms of demographic and injury characteristics, and neurobehavioral functioning.

Registry Project Number: 22
Lead Investigator: Kreutzer, J
Lead Center for Project: Virginia Commonwealth University/Medical College of Virginia
Collaborating Investigators: Kolakowsky-Hayner, S
Keywords: outcome, measurement, violence, substance abuse, community integration, assessment
Date of Completion: 01/01/2001
Type: Local
Status of Project: Latest Information Shown

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